How do you know you’re working with a professional builder? Select the right builder and you will have a pleasurable experience, choose the wrong builder and it can be a heartbreaking and costly lesson. Find out the seven crucial questions you must ask. Click the book above to DOWNLOAD NOW.

How do you know you’re working with a professional builder? Select the right builder and you will have a pleasurable experience, choose the wrong builder and it can be a heartbreaking and costly lesson. Find out the seven crucial questions you must ask. Click the book above to DOWNLOAD NOW.

Since the 1980’s the number of multi-generational households in Australia has been on the rise.  Particularly in the metropolitan areas of our major cities, it is now estimated that more than 25% of Australians live with two or more generations under the same roof.

There are several factors contributing to the increase of intergenerational households, many of them surrounding the delay of young adults leaving home… or what’s colloquially become known as ‘failing to launch’.

Multi-generational living is increasingly being used as a way to overcome affordability issues as young people rely on their parents for financial support well in to their 20’s and 30’s.

Higher Education

With employers demanding highly educated workers, more and more young people are undertaking post-school studies increasing the number of years they spend in education.  With undergraduate and postgraduate qualifications becoming common, young people are delaying their entry in to the workforce and decreasing their short-term financial prospects.

Other Factors

Higher education is however not the only reason for multi-generational living arrangements.   Other factors seen regularly extending young people’s stay in the family home include:

  • Unemployment and workplace volatility
  • Delayed partnering
  • Health issues, particularly with the prevalence of anxiety and depression
  • cohabitingSustained growth of the Australian property market has also meant that home ownership has become unaffordable for many. This can also be seen through the reduction in the number of first home buyers entering the market.
  • The increase in the cost of childcare has seen many young families identify grandparents as a more affordable alternative.

So if you have a kipper, twixter, freeter or boomerang child you may want to come to terms with the fact they be hanging around for a little while longer.  Or maybe you should be prepared for when they want to return!  In any case contact Perth Granny Flat Specialist to find out how a granny flat might benefit you! (08) 9284 7778

In last weeks’ blog we looked at Perth’s bush fire prone areas and explained that properties within these areas would need to be assessed for their Bushfire Attack Level (BAL) prior to building a granny flat.

But what happens after your BAL has been established?

Depending on your exposure to radiant heat and risk of ember attack or direct flame contact there are several products and methods we can use to help protect your building in the event of a bushfire.

 

Ember Attack

Embers are small pieces of burning twigs/branches/leaves/debris that are carried by the wind and land on or around houses before, during and after a bushfire.  Should embers land in gutters, enter roof spaces, get under doorways or be blown through windows it is then very easy for a building to catch alight even if a great distance from the fire front itself.

Some of the ways we can limit the damage of ember attack include:

  • Using aluminium flyscreens to windows and doors
  • Installing ember guards to gutters
  • Sealing all junctions between the external walls and roof
  • Installing sarking underneath wall cladding and roofing
  • Installing weather/draught seals to doors
  • Metal mesh over vents and openings

    How do you know you’re working with a professional builder? Select the right builder and you will have a pleasurable experience, choose the wrong builder and it can be a heartbreaking and costly lesson. Find out the seven crucial questions you must ask. Click the book above to DOWNLOAD NOW.

  • Sealing around all roof and wall penetrations
  • Sprinkler systems

 

Direct Flame Contact

Preparing for your granny flat to be able to withstand direct contact with flames during a bushfire, some of the recommended protection measures include using:

  • Aluminium window frames
  • Hardwood timbers that are naturally fire resistant
  • Timbers that have a fire-retardant treatment
  • Non-combustible wall claddings such as fibre cement
  • Toughened or laminated glass in windows and doors
  • Solid timber external doors

Should you be considering building a granny flat in a bushfire prone area, you may also consider upgrading and retro-fitting some of these features to your existing home.

 

To discuss your ideas and options for building a granny flat please contact us at Perth Granny Flat Specialist on (08) 9284 7778.

In the last few years there have been numerous fire events that have devastated bushland areas and destroyed or damaged properties around the country.  Australia is one of the most bushfire prone countries in the world and some of its driest climatic regions are in the south west part of Western Australia.  As our population continues to grow and weather patterns become increasingly unpredictable more and more Australians are likely to be affected by this danger.

Vast amounts of research has been conducted to identify areas prone to, and at risk of, bushfire.  This has lead to the implementation of protective policies, procedures and standards at national, state and local levels.

Are you thinking about building a granny flat but don’t know where to start? In this FREE GUIDE you will find great information about whether your property is suitable, how to choose the right builder for you and the steps to a successful building experience! You need to read this!

Some of these include:

  • Australian Standard AS3959-2009: Construction of Buildings in Bushfire Prone Areas
  • National Construction Code P2.3.4
  • State Planning Policy 3.7: Planning in Bushfire Prone Areas

These all refer to bushfire prone areas and land subject, or likely to be subject to, bushfires.

Building in a Bushfire prone Area

If you would like to build a granny flat and your property is located in a Bushfire Prone Area you will be required to have a Bushfire Attack Level (BAL) Assessment carried out.  This not only helps to identify your property’s individual risk to bushfire but also the construction requirements needed to improve the new building’s ability to withstand attack and provide protection in the event of a bushfire.

A BAL Assessment measures the severity of a building’s potential exposure to ember attack, radiant heat and direct flame contact.  It is calculated using sophisticated scientific modelling and assessing the type of nearby vegetation and its proximity to the building, the slope of your property and local weather patterns.

The six ratings available are:

BAL-Low

BAL12.5

BAL19

BAL29

BAL40

BAL-Flame Zone

If your property is not in a bushfire prone area, you can still engage the professional services of an assessor to calculate the defendable space required to protect your granny flat in the event of a bushfire, and provide strategies on how to reduce ember attack and identify and manage the vegetation surrounding the building.

To find out if your property is located in a Bushfire Prone Area you can use this Department of Fire & Emergency Services Map or contact us at Perth Granny Flat Specialist (08) 9284 7778.

Are you thinking about building a granny flat but don’t know where to start? In this FREE GUIDE you will find great information about whether your property is suitable, how to choose the right builder for you and the steps to a successful building experience! You need to read this!

Before You Start Structural Renovations…

Conducting a structural renovation can be a great way to add an extra room onto your existing home, but the process can be complicated when it comes to determining how the new room will affect the layout of your home. In some cases, it can be extremely difficult to find a place to add the new room without having to rearrange a large portion of the rest of the house as well to accommodate access to the addition.

Consider a Granny Flat Instead!

Building a granny flat in the backyard can be a much more economical option, which will also give you a lot more flexibility in how you choose to use the additional space. For those who manage rental properties, this added flexibility can open up the property to a much larger pool of potential new tenants. You can even rent out the granny flat of your owner-occupier property as a holiday let to bring in a bit of extra income.

Bupa Landlord Insurance​ cited our advice in a recent post on improving rental properties through structural renovations. The article, ‘Structural Renovation Tips for Your Investment Property’, offers lots of great tips for boosting the value of your investment.

Give Perth Granny Flat Specialist a call today to learn more about building a granny flat on your property – (08) 9284 7778.

Are you thinking about building a granny flat but don’t know where to start? In this FREE GUIDE you will find great information about whether your property is suitable, how to choose the right builder for you and the steps to a successful building experience! You need to read this!

Timber is an inspiring product.  It comes from the natural environment and no two pieces are ever the same.  As humans, we interact with timber differently to any other building material.  It can connect us with mother nature through the built environment.

In this TED Talk, architect Michael Green argues timber to be the most technologically advanced building material we have and that the pressure of urbanisation and population growth demands we look at alternatives to concrete and steel.

Almost half of the worlds contribution to greenhouse emissions come from the construction industry.  This is more than that contributed by the transport industry.

And in fact, 8% of greenhouse gas emissions come from the production of concrete and steel alone.  This means building our homes and cities from these products requires a lot of energy and results in waste and pollution.

The two ways in which we can address this are to reduce our production of greenhouse gases and/or increase our ability to store such emissions.  Timber is the only product that can do both.  Timber is the only building material that is grown by the power of the sun.  It provides us with oxygen and absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.  By taking a tree, turning it in to timber and using it in a building, we are storing that carbon forever.

Engineering timber construction is easy, the science of fire enables us to make buildings safe, and there are sustainable models for forestry which can ensure trees are grown and harvested appropriately.   For Green, the challenge is changing society’s perceptions…

Watch Michael Green’s TED talk.

If you are considering the sustainability and environmental impact of your granny flat, please contact Perth Granny Flat Specialist to discuss our experience with timber framing – (08) 9284 7778.

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